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Stunted Morupule B weighs down on GDP, BPC and coal

Publishing Date : 20 January, 2020

Author : TSAONE SEGAETSHO

The ever on and off Morupule B Power Station is, according to latest research and statistical reports, almost short circuiting this country’s economy as its operational woes are infecting the country’s GDP, coal production and Botswana Power Corporation(BPC) credit rating.


Recently, when assigning a rating to power utility BPC, internationally respected credited rating agency, Moody's Investors Service gave the corporation a Baa2 rating but not without taking out from the good credit. What dented BPC’s good marks was Morupule B, which is said to be delayed in construction and will not be fully available to supply this country’s growing electricity demand. Botswana will remain less electricity sufficient until 2023, as it is the year which the works of Morupule B is expected to fully complete. Morupule B is currently undergoing remediation programme on its boilers.


“Moody's assessment of very high support for the company were revised downwards. In addition, severe delays or uncertainty around the remediation programme of Morupule B plant could also put downward pressure on the rating,” said Moody’s recent report on BPC highlighting operational challenges facing BPC.


Because of Morupule B woes, Moody’s expects upward rating pressure is unlikely to be in the medium term. According to Moody’s, its rating also reflects the company's significant asset concentration and poor asset quality, with multiple design and construction issues affecting output from BPC's coal fired plants. The poor reliability of its power plants increases Botswana's reliance on electricity imports reducing visibility over the company's internally generated cash flows, says Moody’s.


“While the Morupule A power plant (132 megawatt (MW) is expected to come back fully online this year, the remediation programme for the larger Morupule B power plant (600 MW), has only started and there is uncertainty around the improvement in the plant's availability once the works have been completed in 2023, as per the current schedule,” said Moody’s.


Moody’s assessment comes after the third quarter of 2019, when the 600MW Morupule B was said to be “fully operational” and this was for the first time since its seven years of woes. There was much hope after BPC injected a P1.2 billion overhaul on Morupule B. Since its inception in 2012, as an expansionary projection to Morupule A, Morupule B lived on four years and had a documented exposure of it failing to launch due to poor design.


After coming with much fanfare from as an answer to Botswana’s growing power demand, this country was left to go back to the drawing board of reliance on its insufficient 120MW, Morupule A plant and two emergency diesel plants with output of 195MW. Botswana was left to starve for electricity as South Africa’s Eskom became increasingly unreliable and was slowly pulling out the socket that supplies Botswana.


Adding to depression of BPC crediting by Moody’s pointing a finger towards Morupule B, is the latest Statistics Botswana Gross Domestic Product (GDP) report for the quarter under review (Q3) released in December which says the plant was not operating at full capacity.
The report showed a decrease in the Electricity real value added which attributed to a decline in the local electricity production by 39.6 percent. Furthermore, imports of Electricity went up by 119.6 percent during the quarter under review (Q3).


Statistics Botswana said the significant decrease in local Electricity production were largely due to reduced performance of the Morupule B Power Station which was not operating at full capacity. Another report which shows Morupule B to be hampering Botswana’s economy is the Index of the Physical Volume of Mining Production by Statistics Botswana, which also lays all the blame on the same plant for sabotaging coal production. The report says the decline in coal production is mainly as a result of low uptake by Morupule B Power station.


“Coal production dropped by 28.6 percent during the third quarter of 2019, compared to production registered during the same quarter of the previous year, the decline is mainly as a result of low uptake by Morupule B Power station which has resumed remedial works on the boilers. Although production fell, it is important to note that there was no shortfall in supply of coal due to stockpiling undertaken during the previous months. The quarter-on-quarter comparison, likewise, reflects a decrease of 23.5 percent when compared to the preceding quarter,” said the Index of the Physical Volume of Mining Production.

Contradiction

However, a report contradicting assessment and statistical information which paints a gloomy picture and far-fetched hope on Morupule B progress was also released recently. The recent Electricity Generation and Distribution Q3 2019 report which acknowledges the plant’s major contribution on domestic electricity production saying it eases Botswana’s over-reliance on electricity imports.


According to the Electricity Generation and Distribution Q3, when looking at the quarter-on-quarter comparison being Q2 versus Q3, it shows an increase of 16.0 percent, from 96.0 during the second quarter of 2019 to 111.3 during the current quarter. According to Statistics Botswana, the Index of Electricity Generation stood at 111.3 during the third quarter of 2019, reflecting a year-on-year decrease of 39.6 percent compared to 184.3 recorded during the corresponding quarter in 2018.


According to the national statistics, the quarter-on-quarter perspective shows that local electricity generation increased by 16.0 percent from 403, 576 MWH during the second quarter of 2019 to 467, 974 MWH during the period under review. The 16.0 percent increase is said to emanate from improved performance of power generators at the Morupule B power station during the current quarter.


When comparing the corresponding quarters, the Q3 of 2018 and 2019, the physical volume of electricity generated decreased by 39.6 percent, from 774,822 MWH during the third quarter of 2018 to 467,974 MWH during the current quarter. Morupule B also became the MVP of the quarter under review as it helped Botswana to import less electricity from South Africa’s less sufficient Eskom. In Q3 of 2019 Eskom was the main source of imported electricity at 58.5 percent of total electricity imports.

After a new power deal signed last year, Electricidade de Mozambique supplied 20.7 percent while 14.9 percent, 4.5 percent and 1.4 percent were sourced from the Southern African Power Pool (SAPP), Cross-border markets and Namibia’s Nampower respectively. When looking at the quarter-on-quarter comparison, there is a decrease of 3.4 percent (17,906 MWH), from 522,021 MWH during the second quarter of 2019 to 504,115 MWH during the period under review.


This decrease in imported electricity is attributed to improvement in local generation, jumpstarted by improvement of Morupule B. However the physical volume of imported electricity increased by 119.7 percent (274,688 MWH), from 229,427 MWH during the third quarter of 2018 to 504,115 MWH during the current quarter.Contribution of Electricity Generation to Distribution


According to Statistics Botswana electricity generated locally contributed 48.1 percent to electricity distributed during the third quarter of 2019, compared to a contribution of 77.2 percent during the same quarter in 2018. This gives a decrease of 29.1 percentage points.
On the other hand, said the National Electricity Statistics, a quarter-on-quarter comparison shows that the contribution of electricity generated to electricity distributed during the current quarter increased by 4.5 percentage points compared to the 43.6 percent contribution of locally generated electricity during the second quarter of 2019.


Most of Botswana’s electricity has been imported from South Africa’s power utility, Eskom, but in 2008 South Africa’s electricity demand started to exceed its supply resulting in the country restricting power exports. For more than a decade Botswana has been struggling with electricity imported from South Africa, as dependency on the country’s electricity import became increasingly unreliable, hence government efforts to increase local generation of electricity at Morupule Power Station. The Morupule Power A plant has a capacity of 132 MWH and was augmented with Morupule Power B, which is to have a capacity of 600 MWH upon completion. but has been dogged with scandals and lack of or slow progress.

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