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IEC blocks DIS election machine

Publishing Date : 14 October, 2019

Author : KETUMILE RAMATITI

Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) has distanced its office from the procurement of the Communications and Intelligence Machine that was to be used in the upcoming general elections and further confirmed that the equipment will not be used in the polls.


This comes after the leader for the Umbrella for Democratic Change (UDC), Duma Boko interdicted through the courts, equipment that was to be purchased by Directorate of Intelligence Services (DIS). The machine that was to be procured from a Switzerland based company was solely the DIS brainchild with the election custodian IEC pushed away. The machine could be used to intercept elections data processes and can be programmed to advance the interest of a given client. This raised eyebrows of most key players, including political parties and IEC.


This week, IEC through its spokesperson Osupile Maroba, confirmed that this year’s elections will follow the traditional manual way of voting and counting. “We have never been in the process of procuring any machine as the IEC and I can tell you that for this elections, will be doing the same way we have been doing in the past elections. We know nothing about the machine you are referring to as the commission” he revealed in an interview with this publication.


Before Boko interdicted the purchase of the machine there was a growing concern by his party that it could be used by the ruling party for undue illegal surveillance purposes. This, it was argued that the BDP which enters the 23rd October elections, unsure of the election outcomes, could organize electoral fraud by mixing up the Identity cards related equipment with possibilities of opposition voters not allowed to vote as their ID numbers might not tally with what is in the voters roll. The machines were to be useful in opposition stronghold constituencies, those in the know have told this publication.


For IEC, they were not bothered by the purported acquisition of the machine. “Since the Electronic Voting Machine (EVM), was repelled by parliament there is no machine that will be used for the elections. It has to go through process and we had to be taking part in that, so there is nothing of that sort,” Maroba stated.


Any usage of machine on this year’s polls was always going to meet with resistance from stakeholders as evidenced by the intensive rejection of the EVM. What could have made it more difficult for Surveillance and Intelligence Equipment to see the light of the day is the timing and process it was intended to be used. “IEC is also aware of the significance of this year’s elections so they would not want to upset people like that. Machine has not been bought and it will not,” one observer revealed to this publication.


ADVANCED POLL REGISTER 25,044 VOTERS

Meanwhile 1,044 ballot papers have crossed the border as the IEC will today carry elections for Batswana outside the country. “The process has been going very well and the last box of paper flew on Wednesday to its destination”, Maroba shared. Batswana voters will only be allowed to cast their vote in countries where this nation has diplomatic missions. After this election, police officers and IEC staff will also cast their vote on the 19th. “Police and IEC staff who will be working on the day will vote early. The total number we have registered is around 24, 000.”


OBSERVER MISSIONS FLOCK BOTSWANA AHEAD OF ELECTIONS


With only 10 days left before the Election Day, various election observer missions have shown interest in observing this year’s polls. Already, Maroba says, seven international organisations have illustrated interest to observe the local elections which are normally described as free and fair. “We have seven organisations that have shown intent to see our elections including African Union, European Union and other bodies that normally observe our elections.”


The number of observer mission organisations are nothing strange as it is the same number IEC usually accredit despite the intensity of this year’s elections. However, the number could rise because interested parties apply through the Ministry of International Affairs with IEC only focused on accreditations.


“A number of bodies apply through the ministry and we do accreditations. For now I can’t state the numbers we are expecting because we don’t deal with applications. As for the SADC observer mission, which normally arrive before others, I guess they are looking at their budget to see for how long they would come but for now we have not accredited them but they have sensitized us about their intentions to be here on election date,” said Maroba.


In the past elections international observers have noted with concern, low turnout by the local observer groups but this has been corrected. Botswana Council of Non-Governmental Organisations (BOCONGO), will be leading the local observer mission for the first time, with Botswana Council of Churches also on the mix.

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