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Independent MP Candidates reach 27; Councillors 247

Publishing Date : 09 September, 2019

Author : UTLWANANG GASENNELWE

The number of independent candidates vying for parliamentary seats in the coming October 23 General Elections is continuing to rise, with this week standing at 27. In June, Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) had registered twenty (20) and therefore the number grew by seven in a space of three months.


According to official information from the IEC, the number is still expected to surge before General Elections. The number of independent vying for the Council seats from the IEC as of this week also stood at a whopping 247. It has increased exponentially from just 198 three months back in June. The independents will contest in the 57 constituencies and 490 wards across the length and breadth of the country. In 2014, research indicates that there were 29 independent candidates at the time of elections and none of them went on to win a parliamentary seat.


However, in 2009, Nehemiah Modubule representing Lobatse constituency made history by becoming the first independent to win a parliamentary seat. He nonetheless went on to lose the constituency in 2014 after joining opposition Botswana Movement for Democracy (BMD). The ex-legislator is also seeking re-election under the same party banner in this election. In 2009, the IEC only registered a paltry 15 independent MP candidates.


The Electoral Commission has also confirmed that the number of independent candidates for this election is continuing to grow and it’s likely to present the highest record number in years. An official at the IEC further said this week that the new names will still be received on the presidential nomination day which is scheduled for 21 September as well as on nomination day for other candidates, MP’s and Councillors - on the 26th September 2019.


“Yes the number of independents may further balloon. We would still be having new names coming up if there is any. I mean those who would be applying on the day before nomination or on nomination day,” the official said. Speaking to Weekend Post, Osupile Maroba, the IEC spokesperson also confirmed that the number of independents will swell with time.


“The rate at which the independents candidates are registering with us, the number is likely to grow up especially towards the impending elections. If the numbers grow at this rate they will outshine any record,” he said then. Meanwhile, a UB Political analyst in the Political Science department, Leornard Sesa also lately told this publication that some of the independent candidates have political origins or where they come from and that should inform his top analysis of the matter.


“You will realise that most of these independents have roots where they come from, and if from political parties you will find internal squabbles and conflicts that led them to register as independents,” Sesa pointed out. If you look at the parties, he said where there is a new leader, other members’ revolt when they get exposed to new leadership styles that they are not used to. “But people have to welcome and accept whichever leader comes on board, with his her own thinking,” he said.  


According to Sesa, the collective ideologue of politics, it appears, is no longer respected. He continued: “there is a big brother mentality by some members over some political parties. So they end up being suspended, expelled or quitting on their own volition, when it becomes hot in the kitchen.”  The Political Scientist gave the ruling Botswana Democratic Party (BDP) as an example to validate his analogy.


“The party has been slapping some members, seen as non-conformist, with suspensions and expulsions. In the end, feeling aggrieved, such members end up with no option but becoming independents candidates, hence the skyrocketing number,” he said. Some of the prominent independents candidates include Jacob Kamal who lost the BDP Lobatse constituency primary election, as well as Tshephang Mabaila who also lost the party primary in Mogoditshane. Others are former Serowe North BDP legislator Ramadeluka Seretse among the many others.


Youth voters decline

Meanwhile, the IEC has registered 383 485 youths voters in Botswana in 2019 which makes 41.4 percent of the overall eligible electorates which stands at 926 003. This is decline in percentage compared to 2014 general Elections, in which IEC had registered 379 188 equating to 45.99 percent of the total 825 582 qualified voters.


The electorates’ trend continues: More females that males

In 2019 General Elections, 504 680 females have registered to cast their votes against 420 299 males compared to 456 087 females and 368 347 males in 2014.   This can easily mean more women will decide or form a government through the ballot than men. Altogether the Electoral Commission official final results indicate that in the coming 2019 General Elections, 926 003 has registered although the target was 1 273 880. The number has increased from 2014 in which 825 382 registered whilst the target was 1 067 218. 

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