Home » News » General » Repel Civil Servants Entrepreneurship Policy

Repel Civil Servants Entrepreneurship Policy

Publishing Date : 14 May, 2018

Author : BONIFACE KEAKABETSE

Botswana’s Civil Servants entrepreneurship policy which allows civil servants to do business with the same government they are working for is akin to incubating corruption.      

    
This view was expressed by participants of Business Botswana Ethics Forum (BBEF) during a seminar at Maun Lodge. BBEF is a strategic forum initiated by the Directorate on Corruption and Economic Crime (DCEC) and University of Botswana and is aimed at promoting good governance and business ethics in all sectors of the economy.     


Speaking, John Riley, a local Maun businessman said the policy of civil servants engaging in business with government could be unethical and pose a threat of unfair competition. He said civil servants are therefore a referee and a player at the same time and therefore this pose a ripe environment for corruption. Riley asked rhetorically: “Where does a civil servant who is in to business draw a line between personal interests and office duties when it comes to tenders that he has direct interest in?    


Riley further observed that there is an emerging form of corruption known as ‘corruption by time wasting.’ He said this is where civil servants deliberately delay service delivery as a deliberate bottle neck to solicit bribes on members of the public desperate for service.
Participants felt that the policy puts DCEC in a tight corner and should have not been implemented without any convincing monitoring mechanism on the ground.    

          
Lentswe Mothoganetsi, head of DCEC in Maun said Botswana’s ranking as least corrupt country in Africa does not mean that there is no corruption in Botswana. He observed that in Africa, Botswana is already compared to severely corrupt countries hence the reality is that the country is only better in Africa but not internationally it is ranked at grade C when it comes to corruption.


Mothoganetsi told the gathering that DCEC has partnered with Statistics Botswana to undertake a survey that which will show the true extent of corruption by Botswana standards. Mophutolodi Molatedi, acting Assistant Director, Corruption Prevention Division at DCEC, said ethical frameworks like BBEF, whistle blowing arrangements, conflict and asset declaration are needed for the promotion of anti-corruption.  


Molatedi further posited that of recent days, Botswana has witnessed dissolution of boards, discreditation and dismissal of Executive leadership in both private and government owned establishments on account of among others reports of fraud and mismanagement of funds. She said, “These are the few highlights that we are here today to positively reflect upon. Today we have been presented with an opportunity to take a stance on how integrity in our economy and particularly our specific sectors will be instilled and safeguarded going from here.”


Professor Oluwatoyin Kolawole of the University of Botswana’s Okavango Research Institute said government and the private sector have a duty to solve the grave realities of corruption, fraud and anti competitive realities and to devise appropriate strategic interventions for the problem. Kalawole noted that the business sector, state owned enterprises and civil society as the engine of economic growth, job creation and entrepreneurship continue to be riddled with undesirable reality of facilitating business through corrupt means such as bribes.
“All this goes against principles of integrity, corporate governance, legal requirement and good corporate citizenry” he said


He further posited that forums like BBEF are created at various levels to dialogue and address pertinent issues adding that at national level such forums could comprise of representatives of key private sector associations and stakeholders from civil society. Lecturer in the Department of Humanities at UB, Abel Tabalaka said good ethics are needed for business to thrive adding that the world economic crunch is an example of what can go wrong when good business ethics are no followed. The Maun Seminar was held under the theme: “pioneering Business Ethics in Botswana.”

Cartoon

Polls

Do you think the closure of BCL will compel SPEDU to double their efforts in creating job opportunities in the Selibe Phikwe?

banner_14.jpg
banner_12.jpg

POPULER BRANDS