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BDP moves to dodge Bulela Ditswe in some areas

Publishing Date : 25 January, 2017


With pressure from opposition parties increasing at every election, Botswana Democratic Party (BDP) has eight (8) candidates unopposed out of the 18 opposition held constituencies’ primary elections. The party is gearing up for the 2019 General Elections.

It is the first time the party sees such an unprecedented number of Members of Parliament (MP’s) candidates going unopposed. The next general elections are promising to be hotly contested with BDP likely to face fierce competition never experienced since independence.
The BDP popular vote has been dwindling in the past election years with the party getting 46.5% in the 2014 General Elections, while in 2009 they attained 51.73% and prior to that in 2004 they got 57.17%.

To counter the opposition in the next polls, BDP has suspended primary elections in some opposition held constituencies where compromises were reached to avoid disgruntled losers from Bulela Ditswe dividing its vote. Some of the signature compromises; BDP Secretary General Mpho Balopi will represent the party against opposition parties at Gaborone North where MP Haskins Nkaigwa is sitting in for UDC.

On the other hand Anna Mokgethi has also been chosen to stand in for domkrag at Gaborone Bonnington North. UDC’s President Duma Boko is currently the substantive representative of the area. In Gaborone Central, the ruling party has selected Tumisang Hill to lock horns with the opposition in the make of AP’s Phenyo Butale while at Kanye South the party has fielded Lemogang Kwape to try to wrestle the area from UDC’s Abram Kesupile. Up north, Reaboka Mbulalwa will also stand in for domkrag at Maun West, the area currently occupied by an independent MP Tawana Moremi.

Dithapelo Keorapetse, at Selibe Phikwe West also awaits Allen Lekwapa who will be the torch bearer for the ruling party in the area. In addition, Thulaganyo Segokgo is also the compromise candidate for the BDP in the looming national elections in Tlokweng. He is likely to face area lawmaker Masego Segokgo. Meanwhile it is not clear yet as to whether the UDC will replace constituencies that were previously occupied by the departed legislators that formed Alliance for Progressives (AP).

By compromises, has BDP increased its fortunes in 2019?

Asked to shed light on the BDP compromise matter, University of Botswana (UB) lecturer and renowned Political Analyst, Daniel Molaodi pointed out this week that, with the compromises, if genuine, the BDP may have positioned itself well for a good chance in the next elections.
“So, yes I believe, by these compromises, BDP indeed has positioned itself well especially if by so doing have solved the uncertainties that often come as a result of its party primary election dubbed Bulelwa Ditswe,” Molaodi told Weekend Post.

According to Molaodi, if the compromise process was smooth and voluntary; it then puts the BDP on a better position to contest effectively at the impending 2019 General Elections. “They may even get those areas currently in the hands of opposition parties. This however will apply only if there is no hidden agenda in the compromise decision,” the academic pointed out.  

What prompted the compromises?

He believes the compromises are in fact a response to Bulela Ditswe as it has always had problems that normally followed the internal election where some candidates were often not agreeing with the emerged winner and final candidate. This, he added that often led to resentment and divisions in the party based on drawn lines of who stood elections which mostly ended up with a culmination of independent candidates badly affecting the party fortunes. Other disgruntled party members he said would then also join opposition parties as a sign of dissatisfaction.

The UB lecturer also continued: “some choose to sit back and disengage and sometimes to the extent of even not voting, and that obviously impacts the BDP fortunes. So, this has led to BDP losing constituencies to opposition.” “So, I think more BDP constituencies are unopposed as they are doing this as a healing process to position themselves. Whether or not it will be effective is another issue for discussion. It also hinges on how the compromise was conducted. Were those who compromised genuine about it or were forced?” he asked rhetorically.  

Does then opposition stand a chance in 2019?

With regard to the opposition, the independent thinker stated that they won some constituencies in the last 2014 General Elections precisely due to a strong bond, unity and cooperation amongst themselves (opposition parties). But since, opposition is now showing signs of disunity, at least up to this point; Molaodi highlighted that the next elections may be a different case. Botswana Movement for Democracy (BMD) he cited that it is not united as of now due to the breakaway of Alliance for Progressives (AP).

According to the Political Analyst, although not yet tested, it appears like AP has more numbers than BMD since their departure and if this is accurate it will definitely hurt the UDC at the next polls. But all in all, Molaodi contended that the current debacle in opposition may affect them. “AP looks set to go separate ways with UDC in the coming elections, and this will be a huge loss to opposition. The opposition as a whole might even lose the constituencies they currently hold. They will be a vote split especially if indeed the AP numbers are higher.”

On the flipside he also stated that “it can only be an advantage to opposition only if AP gets more numbers from BDP and not from UDC per se. It may help both UDC and AP and consequently weaken BDP.” He also pointed out that the numbers lost from BMD to AP can also be supplemented by Botswana Congress Party (BCP)’s entrance and therefore there is chance that still UDC can do well “although it remains to be seen.”

Are these BDP compromises undemocratic?

In addition, the UB academic said there are also some within the BDP that believe these compromises are not a good idea as they are in a way undemocratic thereby purging other people against standing despite being their democratic right to do so. “It also denies electorates to elect their preferred candidates at the polls, starting at the primary elections. It also depend on who the compromise candidate is in the eyes of the electorates in terms of whether they believe someone better have been left out behind and this may be detrimental to the candidate and the party.”

Molaodi also wondered as to what extent was the general membership involved in terms of whether there was a thorough consultation with the BDP members with regard to the compromises. “Was there not even a single dissent from the party structures and what has been done about it?” the UB scholar said.



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