banner_9.jpg
banner_274.jpg
Breaking News
Sunday, 17 December 2017
Home » News » General » Gaolathe blames DIS for Botswana troubles

Gaolathe blames DIS for Botswana troubles

Publishing Date : 20 November, 2017

Author : ALFRED MASOKOLA

Leader of newly formed Alliance for Progressives (AP) Ndaba Gaolathe has said the formation of the controversial intelligence unit; Directorate of Intelligence Services (DIS) was the beginning of troubles that have led to the collapse of the country’s governance standards.  


Gaolathe said the formation of the DIS is the indication that government has seemed to focus on those reforms that made Botswana’s entire governance system to regress. “As long as we are here, we will not relent from pouring cold water on the legislation that brought the DIS to life, which monster has injected a rapacious poison into our life-blood as a people,” he said.


DIS was established amid controversy shortly after President Lt Gen Ian Khama assumed office in 2008. The Disaster Fund was diverted to help establish the organisation amid strong resistance from Botswana Democratic Party (BDP) backbenchers as well as opposition legislators.


“Whether it is real or perceived the DIS is at the heart of everything that is wrong about our Governance system – it is an institution that has been associated with extrajudicial killings, the nepotistic award or non-award of mega-lucrative tenders, immigration decisions for expatriates and investors as well as non-merit appointments to key Government roles in the Executive and Judiciary,” Gaolathe said.


The former Botswana Movement for Democracy (BMD) President said that the DIS has caused many to fear their own Government and further indicated that it is a remarkable irony that the DIS’s most robust defenders are the ones that actually fear it most. “And yes, there is room for an intelligence agency in any democracy provided that there are legislative safeguards against abuse of such powers,” he said.


“Botswana is ripe for such safeguards including ones that set up technical/specialized panels with rights and powers to audit the uses of funds by the DIS, and independent panel with full oversight functions including treatment of abuse cases.”
Gaolathe said to date, there has been no audit of the DIS by the Auditor General, or at least such a report had not reached the Legislature describing a major blemish from which citizens cannot and must not hide as a people.


The AP leader also expressed his opposition to the use of the controversial Electronic Voting Machine (EVM) in the upcoming 2019 general elections. “We know the majority are opposed to the use of the EVM in the next elections, yet the Executive seems bent on disregarding the voice of the majority. We must do all we can to resist this blatant miscarriage of justice.” Last week, leader of opposition Duma Boko promised that, if the government did not back down on the Electoral Amendment Bill, there would be no elections in 2019.


Gaolathe said under the current leadership Botswana has failed as a nation to live up to even the basic tenets and promise of the spirit of the constitution as originally envisaged by the forefathers. “Those who came before us must have believed or expected us to perfect their idea of Government - first, by putting to life whenever resources allowed the ingredients for a three-armed Government with not only the requisite checks and balances but the capacity and capabilities to dispatch the mandate of governing with distinction and, second, by reforming our systems in accordance with the dictates of our ensuing circumstances. We have fallen short on both counts,” he observed.


“Our parliament is in a state of paralysis in that ordinary members of parliament that are not part of the executive lack the professional support to draft bills in a comprehensive and timely fashion. Allow me to be fair, our Parliament is no superior to the Student Representative Councils of the more established schools around the world.”  Gaolathe, who prior to joining BMD in 2010 was viewed as a BDP future cabinet member said for decades many countries benchmarked on Botswana’s Judiciary.


“There was a time when our judiciary was the pride of our nation, arguably the arm of Government that enjoyed almost perfect goodwill from our people, for impeccable fairness as well as intellectual rigor and integrity,” he noted. “Today, the Judiciary is increasingly viewed as an extension of the President’s sphere of influence, sharing in the political contamination that comes with a Presidency that believes in centralizing power around itself.


This is a source of alarm, in a country whose legislature is already almost defunct, as a result of an overbearing and short-sighted Executive.”Effectively, he said, Botswana is run by a single arm of Government, the Executive branch, and in particular, the Presidency. “The idea of the three arms of Government as enshrined in our Constitution is nothing more than just that, an idea,” he said.

Cartoon

Polls

Do you think the closure of BCL will compel SPEDU to double their efforts in creating job opportunities in the Selibe Phikwe?

banner_14.jpg
banner_12.jpg

POPULER BRANDS