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Home » News » Parliament » Parliament lobbied to divert NDP 11 funds to Phikwe

Parliament lobbied to divert NDP 11 funds to Phikwe

Publishing Date : 15 November, 2016

Author : ALFRED MASOKOLA

Tati East Member of Parliament, Samson Guma has called on legislators to sacrifice projects allocated to their constituencies and instead divert the funds to Selebi Phikwe, which plunged into economic crisis following the closure of the BCL mine last month.


The BCL closure has been viewed across the entire political divide as the worst economic crisis ever to hit the country apart from the 2008 global economic recession. Although the Minister of Finance and Development Planning, Kenneth Matambo, has indicated that the closure of BCL will have a minimal impact in the country’s overall economic growth, it is generally agreed that the development will leave the people in Selebi Phikwe and surrounding areas in dire economic status.


Guma expressed that when government conceptualised the plan, it was not anticipating the closure of BCL and Tati Nickel or that people in those areas would be under such difficult economic conditions. “We need to be very open and honest as Members of Parliament that there may be a need for us to adjust this plan to accommodate the challenges that we are facing,” he said.


“It cannot be business as usual when people in Selebi Phikwe and Francistown have no jobs. It cannot be. If the plan does not address these particular issues we need to look at it very carefully and say what we are going to do.” The maverick MP remarked that it is imperative for MPs to make amends to the NDP 11 Plan in order to make some sacrifices because once the plan is passed as it is, it could no longer be changed.


“If I had a project in my constituency that may have to be deferred to cater for the issues as arising in Selebi Phikwe and Francistown, I would forgo that project because the situation as is right now requires that all of us make sacrifices,” he stated. According to him, the budget should be focused on what is seen as having economic growth potential for the country in the next six years and also showing potential to grow targeted sectors.  


“If the focus of unpacking economic growth lies in agriculture, we are going to be looking at the budget allocation for agriculture. If at some point in time we find that the budget allocation in here does not assist us in terms of realising this theme, we must look at it very carefully,” he said. “There is no point in building roads in areas that do not assist us with economic growth even if it gives us political advantage.

Look, at some point in time if it means me losing my popularity and losing a constituency but the country benefits, so be it,” he said. Furthermore, the one time Assistant Minister of Finance and Development Planning remarked that infrastructural projects in the NDP 11 must be aimed at basically attending to what government sees as having potential for growing the economy.


“Economic growth is key and without economic growth you have got no employment. You cannot fight poverty eradication issues when an economy is not growing.” Meanwhile, Member of Parliament for Gaborone Bonnington South, Ndaba Gaolathe stated, when debating the plan that in order for government to realise significant growth, its NDP 11 should be linked with the country’s vision.


“In the Vision 2036, the overall vision is Botswana to achieve a high income status; very clearly as a vision. What I am saying is that, that is not coming out in the National Development Plan. What I am saying is that, it needs to be coming out at every corner that this is the vision, this is where we need to go,” he said.


Gaolathe contended that the first thing that Botswana needs as a country is to agree and decide that the country needs to develop only a few globally competitive sectors or clusters and grow them to a major scale and grow them aggressively and put everything  on these forecast clusters. He mentioned the Tourism Cluster, the Diamond Cluster, the Cattle and Agricultural Cluster, the Financial and Services Cluster as the sectors that Botswana need to give the biggest fight.


“The second principle is that we need to be able or we need to build and attract globally competitive manpower. This should speak to the manner in which we train our people, the manner in which we target those who should come and how easy we should make it for them to come to this country,” he said. Gaolathe further added that government would also have to create an environment in which it is easy for industry and different stakeholders to take up technology, to go into business and achieve what needs to be achieved.


“You also need to create targets for yourselves as a country so that after five  years, we are able to account for our achievement and failures and be able to say that we have achieved this or not.” Bogolo Kenewendo, a renowned rising economist and newly nominated Specially Elected MP also made her debut contribution in the legislative house.


The youthful MP stated that government should spend ‘smart’ and put its money not only in areas where it has comparative advantage but also in areas where it has competitive advantage. Kenewendo indicated that business confidence has declined from 82 percent in 2008 to 36 percent in 2016 and noted that government can no longer afford to let it go lower than that.


“The main concerns are to do with water and electricity, I see those two are prioritised but we need the speed to regain back the confidence and growth rates to pre-economic downturn,” she said. “The buzz word nowadays is disruption. Things are moving at a light speed pace and we need to respond and adapt in an agile manner. We need to pick up our pace in relation to this agenda and be able to compete with the best; Rwanda, Mauritius and Singapore.”


Kenewendo, who had a short stint working for Ghana’s Ministry of Trade and Industry as a Trade Economist prior to being elected to parliament, highlighted that there is need for parliament to look at the NDP 11 through youthful lenses and use it as an opportunity to cement the foundation that will carry the nation to the end point of a generation’s horizon.


“Our population structure has changed. We have a youth bulge which has led to the growth of the working age population from 46.9 percent in 2001 to 64.9 percent in 2011. Our dependency ratio has also changed as a result, when previously we would only focus on the ratio of those aged 0-14 and 65 upward to that of working age, we now have to consider some of those among the working age as dependents too,” he said.  


“This is as a result of high unemployment in our country. I believe that with this glaring reality, we can therefore justifiably say that this document should have a youthful face, represents the hopes and dreams of young people.”

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