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Home » News » Letters » BROTHER, WHO'S YOUR KEEPER? (I)

BROTHER, WHO'S YOUR KEEPER? (I)

Publishing Date : 08 February, 2016

Author : MOGOTSI D BALOYI

It's one of the most obnoxious responses ever given by man to God. Rude. Crude. Uncouth. Utterly irreverent. "Am I my brother's keeper?" That was the snotty nosed answer of Cain to God's enquiry about the whereabouts of Abel his brother. The question asked by God was a legitimate one. Even in legal circles when a crime of homicide has been committed, the first persons asked are those who were last seen with the victim. So, it wasn't entirely strange that God would ask Cain, the last person seen with Abel, where his brother was. It was just Homicide Investigation 101.

More than that, God's question demonstrates that the social construct we exist in has certain inescapable pillars which keep the whole societal ecosystem in balance. One of those fundamental pillars is accountability. We live in a day and age where it's getting increasingly difficult to guide, let alone advise, people as they go about their daily lives. It's pretty much every man for himself and few see the need to be held responsible for their words or actions. Whoever taught this generation the words, "Do not judge," has bequeathed upon it a curse. Everyone wants to do whatever they please and not be called out on anything. In short, very few people are accountable to anybody.

This is even more dangerous where the unaccountable are men holding public office or religious organizations. The system of checks and balances must not be seen as an encumbrance to anybody's liberties. It is critical to ensure that a society does not degenerate into utter chaos and anarchy. Someone must tell someone else where to stop. What is accountability? It is a check and balance system to protect us from harm from ourselves and others. We do this by being open to what we are thinking and doing so we can receive encouragement and reproof, when needed. It is very unwise and dangerous to be accountable to nobody. The thrill of total freedom might be intoxicating, but it's a suicide mission to have no man who can call you to order. Tragically, our Churches and ministries today, especially in this era where opening a Church is fashionable, are led mostly by young men who have nobody to guide them; nobody they regard as an authority; nobody they fear; and nobody they listen to.

There is an urgent need to teach accountability. Christian accountability is accounting for what we are up to. It is the realization that we are liable, responsible, and answerable for our actions in life to God (Matthew 12:36; Romans 2:16; 14:2; 1 Corinthians 3:10-15; 4:5; 2 Corinthians 5:10), as well as to key Christians in our life (John 13:34 Galatians 6:1-2; Philippians 2:4; Hebrews 10:23-24; James 5:16). Accountability allows us to be answerable to one another, focusing on key relationships such as with our spouse, close friends, colleagues, coworkers, a boss, small group members, and Pastor. It is sharing, in confidence, our heartfelt Christian sojourn in an atmosphere of trust.

Then, we can give an answer for what we do and understand where we need help in areas where we are weak and struggling, where and how we are growing, what we are learning, and to be encouraged. These precepts help us to stay on track, and get prayer, care, and support when we fail. We can also model guideposts for one another in order to keep going. Without an accountability structure in place, chaos soon ensue. Look around. In public office, there's rampant corruption simply because nobody calls another to task. Any time you have "holy cows" running roughshod on everybody else, you're starring calamity in the eye.

In our Churches, when a preacher is unaccountable to anybody, there'll be wanton financial mismanagement, excesses, sexual harassment and abuse of women, and all kinds of games and gimmicks totally unrepresentative of the gospel of Jesus Christ. We are not to allow our liberty and freedom in Christ to cause people to stumble by our actions or inactions. Our faith and actions are monitored closely by God as well as by other people, and we must realize that our actions are more influential than our words.

We will either lift people up or bring them down. Hypocrisy is perhaps the most deadly threat to new or weak Christians who fall victim to it, and is a heinous sin against Christ and His children by those who cause it. We, as the body of Christ, must seek to show right actions to one another, to be cautious, and to act with charity, humility, and self-denial within our Christian liberty. We are still called to be responsible in the correct manner. We may enjoy our freedom, but freedom does not entitle us to do anything we want. A true Christian will never destroy another person's faith so he can have his own way! Our freedom must not bring dishonor, division, or disrepute to the church.

I want to reiterate and harp on the point that we are accountable to one another. You need to have a man in your life who can tell you, "No, you can't do that." It's a false and cheap grace that says we are only accountable to God. That's pure nonsense! God has placed human authorities over our lives for a reason. You cannot ignore or bypass human authority and say, "Only God can judge me." Nice but stupid motto. Judges sentence criminals to prison every day, and all things being equal, God sides with the law.

They are called Judges because they judge, and they are not God. Yes, we are accountable to God first, but we are also very much accountable to one another (2 Chronicles 19:6-7; Ezekiel 34:2-4; Matthew 12:36-37; 2 Peter 2:10-11). We are all fallen creatures; as Christians, we are still in a fallen world living in fallen bodies, but are saved by His grace.

We are declared clean before God by our Lord's work. We all have items and thoughts in our lives that diminish our relationship with God and our effectiveness with others. There is still a process on which to embark to become cleaner. This is called sanctification. As Christians, we are in the process and practice of our faith, growth, learning, and maturity all the days of our lives. At the same time, we are still sinners and susceptible to temptation, spiritual warfare, and our misplaced desires. We have blind spots and need input from others to find them.

If you really want to grow in faith and be effective in ministry, you must be held accountable; otherwise, you will fall, backslide, or be ineffective because of imbued pride. Sin will get you; maybe not today, but tomorrow is still coming. It is decidedly arrogant to think or feel like you don't need anybody over you. It is this very prideful attitude which almost guarantees your fall. Accountability is essential for every Christian to help reach his or her full potential; it is a mandate to those in leadership and ministry. To be honest, nobody should be a leader until they can demonstrate that they are accountable to someone.

The pages of the Bible are filled with stories of people leaning on others for growth and personal and spiritual development. Deep connections help great leaders overcome their struggles and see what they cannot see on their own. Most prominently in the Old Testament are Moses and Aaron (Exodus), and David and Jonathan (1 Samuel 18-20). In the New Testament are Paul and Barnabas, and then Paul with Titus, Silas, and Timothy (Acts 11-14; 2 Corinthians 2:12). And, of course, our Lord Jesus, while He walked this earth, had His twelve with an extra connection to the inner three - Peter, James, and John.

Thus, we can surmise that accountability is not for just for those who are weak, needy, or for wimps; it is for the strong who want to be stronger and the unconnected who need to be connected. If you think, as a man, this is still just for the weak, consider that greatness and authenticity cannot come about without humility and connection (James 4:7-12; 1 Peter 5: 1-11)! "Real men" will be accountable to other real men, and real godly women will be connected to other godly women. Only fools will insist on running solo. There is no way around this vital call! God gives us the call to be deeply connected to one another because we need it. The leaders in the Bible knew this well, Jesus modeled this for us, and the only hindrance is our willingness to comply. Leaders and Pastors who are not accountable will eventually fall, and, until then, be very ineffective. God has called you to be the iron that sharpens others' iron, as their iron will sharpen you (Proverbs 27:17).

Accountability is nothing new, although it seems it is by the topics of sermons and books or from some popular movements within the last ten years; however, it was practiced by pious Jewish teachers before Christ. Accountability was insisted on and practiced by Christ Himself. Just observe how Jesus led the disciples and how He modeled to the disciples.

This was picked up by the early Church; the Reformers all had men in their lives who held them to account, in whom they trusted, took advice from, bounced ideas off of, and who prayed for them. Calvin was especially a proponent of accountability and insisted all of his leaders be held to account, "believers (who) seriously testify, by honoring mutual righteousness among themselves, that they honor God." It was the system he established that became the model of the "check and balance" system of modern governments, first established in the U.S. in their Constitution.

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