Home » Archived News » General » Troubled Lesotho buckles under regional pressure

Troubled Lesotho buckles under regional pressure

Publishing Date : 11 February, 2016

Author : THABO BAGWASI

Minister Pelonomi Venson-Moitoi

Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation Pelonomi Venson-Moitoi has revealed that the Prime Minister of Lesotho Pakalitha Mosisili has averted possible sanctions by the regional bloc Southern African Development Community (SADC) on the tiny mountain kingdom by finally accepting the SADC commissioned report.

Venson-Moitoi said that the possibility of imposing sanctions on Lesotho had crossed the table of discussion as Lesotho had been reluctant to receive the report citing a court case currently underway at home.

She said that Lesotho would still not budge even though SADC advanced reasoning that the regional bloc was immune and protected against the courts of law of member states and that the treaties signed by member states would protect decisions of SADC as well as the decisions of the Commission against any ruling from the Lesotho courts.

The meeting according to Venson-Moitoi still ended without an agreement between Lesotho and the SADC troika.

Venson-Moitoi however said that, the “conclusion was neither the best conclusion nor a conclusion that members states favoured because everybody wishes to see SADC succeeding.”

She continued that member states had for quite a time pleaded with Lesotho to see rational reason before arriving at a dreaded end where they discussed the imposition of biting sanctions, restrictions, limitations and the exclusion of Lesotho from the regional bloc as a proposal for the next SADC summit.

She continued that she believes, President Ian Khama who is also the SADC chairperson, sensing the palpable mood of the member states tailed the issue further beyond the stalemate.  She also believes that Pakalitha Mosisili also sensing the sulk atmosphere among the regional headship did not immediately depart for home and joined the chairman for a private meeting the next morning.

Venson-Moitoi says that the meeting between SADC chairman Ian Khama and Mosisili fundamentally changed the complexion of the previous day’s hard line trajectory that had mulled over imposition of sanctions as well as the expulsion of Lesotho from the regional community, removing the likelihood of a suspension that would have been concluded.

She also says that Mosisili accepted the report on condition that as a head of state leading a coalition government, he would not unilaterally accept the report as he had to go back home to consult his coalition partners before reaching an agreement with the chairman to issue a response to the chairman of the organ and President of Mozambique Felipe Nyusi within 14 days. Nyusi is head of the SADC organ on Politics, Defence and Security.

Venson-Moitoi also said that had Lesotho not accepted the commission’s report SADC was to publicise the report but since it had accepted it the onus falls on Lesotho to publicise it after 14 days. The 14 days agreement also stipulates that Lesotho has to show how it intends to execute constitutional public sector and security sector reforms that came as recommendations from findings of a report by SADC facilitator and South African Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa, for Lesotho to come back into proper democratic governance.

Justice Mpaphi Phumaphi of Botswana had led a 10 member strong commission to investigate among other things; the rupture of political stability in the mountain kingdom and the assassination of Lieutenant-General Maaparankoe Mahao who was killed on the 25th of June 2015. General Mahao was killed on his way from his farm in an operation to arrest soldiers suspected of being involved in a plot to topple Lesotho Defence Force (LDF) military command. Ironically, General Mahao was in 2010 posted at the SADC headquarters in Gaborone as Chief of Staff-SADC Standby Forces (SSF) where he worked for a couple of years. He was also the scion of an accomplished Lesotho family as a brother to National University of Lesotho Chancellor Professor Nqosa Mahao.

The Lesotho government had stalled accepting the Phumaphi Commission of Enquiry report citing a court case in which LDF’s Special Forces Commander Lieutenant-Colonel Tefo Hashatsi accuses the commission of being biased against him to the point that Justice Phumaphi had bordered on accusing him of participating in Mahao’s assassination. Mahao had survived at least one assassination attempt where his family dog was gunned down as the political situation in that country spiralled out of control.

The Lesotho political and state security sector had been severely fractured with the Lesotho Mounted Police Service (LMPS) and Gen. Mahao said to be allied to former Prime Minister Tom Thabane.

Thabane promoted Mahao to the rank of Lieutenant-General in the LDF after a failed military coup d’état resulted in the sacking of Lieutenant-General Tlali Kamoli who is said to be allied to incumbent Prime Minister Mosisili. Gen. Kamoli is also said to be a distant cousin to Prime Minister Mosisili. After winning power in a snap general election Mosisili reinstated Kamoli to the top military post defying SADC facilitator Cyril Ramaphosa who warned that his entry had the potential to spark further political instability in the country.

The Phumaphi commission report was completed on the 23rd of October 25 2015 and handed to SADC on the 6th of December of the same year. Unconfirmed reports indicate that that the Phumaphi commission urges SADC to call for strictly monitored elections in Lesotho, and further calls for the dismissal of some military chiefs in that country.  

This publication learns that Lesotho has been given fourteen days to study the report and comply. The Lesotho cabinet is said to have held an emergency meeting on Wednesday and they now realise the seriousness of SADC leaders.

Cartoon

Polls

Do you think the closure of BCL will compel SPEDU to double their efforts in creating job opportunities in the Selibe Phikwe?

banner_14.jpg
banner_12.jpg

POPULER BRANDS