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Abe Shields Space-Related Sites

Publishing Date : 10 April, 2018

Benson C Saili
THIS EARTH, MY BROTHER

   
General Abraham secures Jerusalem and Sinai spaceport, then marches on Egypt

In GENESIS 15:18, this is what we’re informed: “On that day,  Yahweh contracted a covenant with Abram,  saying, ‘To your seed,  I give this land, from the stream of Egypt as far as the Great Stream, the stream Euphrates’.” I wonder how many Christians have read this passage and vividly grasped its implications.


To those who have not, thankfully we’re on hand to lend a hand. In the passage, Yahweh, the Anunnaki supremo Enlil, undertakes to Abraham, his chosen Shepherd-King for the forthcoming astrological Age of Aries, that he would give his offspring a huge swathe of land stretching from   the stream of Egypt to the Great Stream known as the Euphrates. In case you are a newcomer  to this series, the Stream of Egypt was  the name of the Nile River in antiquity.


There are two curious aspects about Enlil’s promise to Abraham. First, why was Abraham rendered such a promise? What did he do to merit it? When  you read the greater context of Genesis 15, you find yourself at a loss. The promise comes after Abraham performs a ritual in which he sacrifices a heifer, a goat, a ram, and a turtledove to Enlil, which Enlil acknowledges with a stove-hot “fiery torch”that consumes the sacrifices.


It is typical of the Genesis writers, when they want to fudge a matter, to obfuscate things so that the reader is left guessing. But the Sumerian chronicles, from which the Genesis writers researched, are more matter-of-fact.  The land in question was promised to Abraham subject to his fulfilling a most momentous assignment – the conquest of northern Egypt.


That brings us to the second curious aspect about the promise.  It is common knowledge that the river Nile is in Egypt. So why were Abraham’s people, the Hebrews or Hebraic Jews, promised a portion of territory that did not belong to them?  Egypt was not a domain of Enlilites: it was a domain of Enkites. Enlil had no hegemonic jurisdiction over Egypt and Abraham was not an Egyptian at all: he was a Sumerian. So why did Enlil include the whole of Egypt east of the Nile River as part of his future bequest to Abraham and his descendents?


Once again, the Bible far from hits the nail squarely on the head.  But the Sumerian accounts and researchers of Egyptian records are much more revealing. At the time of Abraham, northern Egypt was dominated by Hebrews of Indian origin known as the Hyksos. These were Enlil’s people. We have already related that the Hyksos were planted in northern Egypt by Enlil at a time when Abraham was Pope of India and was based in the part of that country known as Maturea. This was a long-term scheme by Enlil to occupy a part of Egypt (and ultimately possibly overrun it altogether) just as Enkites inhabited vast areas of Canaan and regions of Sumer such as Babylon and Eridu.


In 2048 BC, Marduk had with the guileful assistance of the Hittites seized Harran, a Hebrew stronghold,  forcing the whole of Abraham’s family save for Nahor to depart the city.   It was at this stage that Enlil decided on a counter-penetration of Egypt which should culminate in the annexation of northern Egypt by the Hyksos under the command of Abraham.   


ABE WAS A MILITARY GENERAL

Meanwhile, Abraham was on a roll.  Reading Genesis, one gets the impression that Abraham was no more than a phenomenally successful pastoral farmer. A clutch of bible-based movies that have been made over the years also loyally toe this biblical line. Sadly, it’s all disinformation, if not outright bollocks, which is very common in much of the Old Testament. Firstly, Abraham was not a farmland shepherd: he was a member of a highly influential royal and priestly family. Secondly, Abraham was not simply the leader of the Hebrew race: he was an accomplished military general.


Just like every male member of the British royal family has to do service in a branch of the armed forces, Abraham too was trained as a warrior from a very early age. We see this phenomenon even in African history.  Sechele and Kgosidintsi, the foremost BaKwena princes, as well as Khama the Great and Linchwe I  were all trained warriors and played active parts in wars. In AD 70, Flavius Titus, the Roman general who razed Jerusalem to the ground, was the heir to Roman emperor Vespasian.  


According to the legendary Jewish historian Flavius Josephus, Abraham was at the command of “318 officers under him, with unlimited manpower at his disposal”.  These 318 officers were both his warriors and his personal security detail. Abraham lived n a garrison house and all his soldiers were not only trained by him, with the assistance of Ninurta’s Elamite elite troops,  but were born in the garrison itself.  The Sumerian records also say that Enlil equipped Abraham with “the best chariots, finest horses, 380 well-trained soldiers and weapons that could smite an army of ten thousand men in hours.”


Abraham’s troops were the most formidable of the day. They also were a numerable  force. If, for argument’s sake, each of the 318 officers had 40 men under him, we’re talking of a 12,000-men-strong army. And like his father Terah, Abraham was very well-versed in astronomy and astrology. 


Writes Josephus: “Berosus (the great ancient writer who was once a priest of Marduk) mentions our father Abram without naming him, when he says thus: ‘In the tenth generation after the Flood, there was among the Chaldeans a man righteous and great, and skilful in the celestial science’." Josephus also sets apart Abraham as an extremely wise man.  He was a person of great sagacity, both for understanding all things and persuading his hearers, and not mistaken in his opinions; for which reason he began to have higher notions of virtue than others had …”
    
GENERAL ABE CONQUERS DAMASCUS
    
When Abraham departed Harran after Marduk was lured into taking the city by Ishkur-Adad, he was accompanied by his father Terah and his nephew Lot, the only son of his departed older brother Haran. At some stage after the death of Haran, Abraham had adopted Lot as his own son, a state of affairs the slanted Genesis authors skirted completely. Says Josephus: “Now Abram, having no son of his own, adopted Lot, his brother Haran's son, and his wife Sarai's brother.”


What that meant was that legally, Abraham was not childless before Isaac was born: he already had a heir in the person of Lot. But as they say, blood is thicker than water and so it was the Isaac factor that largely contributed to a parting of ways between Abraham and Lot, which story we will address at the appropriate time.


When Abraham set off from Harran, he was accompanied by his troops. Enlil’s immediate brief to him was to rush and secure Tilmun, the spaceport, and Jerusalem, the Mission Control  Centre. These two space-related sites were potentially vulnerable to capture by Nabu’s people given that the Canaanites were rallying en masse to Nabu’s banner.


Writes Zechariah Sitchin: “Starting in 2047 BC, the sacred Fourth Region (the Sinai Peninsula, the location of Tilmun) became a target and a pawn in the Enlilite struggle with Marduk and Nabu ... The ancient sources indicate that from the safety of the sacred region Nabu ventured to the lands and cities along the Mediterranean coast, even to some Mediterranean islands, spreading everywhere the message of Marduk’s coming supremacy.”


After travelling for about 1000 km, Abraham reached Damascus, in today’s Syria, and noting that it was very strategically located, he decided to take it. Exactly how this conquest panned out is not related in the Bible nor in the familiar Sumerian records.  It is Josephus who enlightens us in this regard. This is what he writes, quoting a certain  historian going by the name Nicolaus of Damascus:  


“Abram reigned at Damascus, being a foreigner, who came with an army out of the land above Babylon, called the land of the Chaldeans: but, after a long time, he removed from that country also, with his people, and went into the land then called the land of Canaan, but now the land of Judea, and this when his posterity were become a multitude ... Now the name of Abram is even still famous in the country of Damascus; and there is shown a village named from him, The Habitation of Abram.”

TERAH IS PRIEST-KING OF JERUSALEM

Abraham directly reigned at Damascus throughout 2048 BC. Then at the onset of 2047 BC, he received instructions from Enlil that he proceed to Canaan. Obliging, he installed a viceroy to hold the fort whilst he was away and commenced his trek southwards.    Abraham’s first port of call was Shechem. Located in the middle of vital trade routes, Shechem was a key commercial centre, trading in local grapes, olives, wheat, livestock and pottery.


As important, it was a bastion of the Canaanites, who as we have already indicated gravitated more toward Marduk than Enlilites. Abraham was therefore determined that he convert the city’s population to Enlilite allegiance. As such, he built an altar there which he dedicated to Enlil. A pleased Enlil once again reiterated the promise he had made to him – that he and his people would inherit the entire land of Canaan.


Next, Abraham moved about a few kilometres south of Shechem and a little beyond a small town known as Shiloh. There, about 12 miles north of Jerusalem,  he again built an altar to Enlil in the vicinities of Mount Moriah and its sister mountains Mount Zophim and the famed Mount Zion.  All these three mountains were located around Jerusalem and housed the Anunnaki’s inter-space travel Mission Control Centre. This can easily be gleaned from the very names of the mountains – Mount Moriah meant “Mount of Directing”; Mount Zophim meant “Mount of Observers”; and Mount Zion meant “Mount of Signal”.   The altar Abraham built here he called Beth-El, meaning “God’s House”.


It was at this time that Terah was ordained as the Priest-King, or Melchizedek, of Jerusalem by Enlil. He was 146 years old having been born in 2193 BC.  Note that with substantial Anunnaki blood coursing through his veins, Terah was not walking on a cane or confined to a hammock: he was still fit and his faculties were intact. Unlike other Canaanite cities, Jerusalem was one particular place where the Enlilites had enormous clout.  


Leaving his father in charge of Jerusalem, Abraham proceeded to Hebron (in today’s West Bank), about 30 km south of Jerusalem. Like Shechem, Hebron was an important economic centre owing to its strategic position on the crossroads  between the Dead Sea to the east, Jerusalem to the north, and the Negev Desert and Egypt to the south. Hebron was also significant in two other ways. Firstly,  nestling in the Judean Mountains, it was militarily well-fortified.


Secondly, it was the one place in the whole of Canaan where the Nephilim (also known as Rephaites) were concentrated. The Nephilim were a gigantic race that had resulted from intermarriages between Earthlings and the Igigi. Unlike demigods, who were also part-Anunnaki, part-Earthling, the Nephilim were not treated as royalty but were in fact spurned as a race of rascals because of their predatory and cannibalistic treatment of mankind in the globalwide famine that preceded the Deluge of Noah’s day.



Abraham was desirous that the Nephilim be won over to the Enlilite cause too. Thus at Hebron too, he built an altar to Enlil. Altars were places where homage was paid to a god, the equivalent of today’s churches. They were not temples or synagogues: they were simply platforms.
 
GENERAL ABE SECURES SPACEPORT


Having secured Jerusalem and having accomplished his devotional ends at Hebron, Abraham moved on.  His destination this time around was the Negev Desert, the principal focus of his mission. The Negev, which meant “The Dryness”, a name that suited its aridity, was a parched region where Canaan and the Sinai Peninsula merged.


The specific place Abraham stationed was known as the Oasis of Kadesh-Barnea. Kadesh-Barnea went by several names, which included Ein-Mishpat, Bad-gal-dingir (the name by which Sumerians called it), and Dur-Mah-Ilani (what Sargon the Great called it). Kadesh-Barnea was the gateway to Tilmun, the spaceport in the Sinai Peninsula. No Earthling was allowed to go beyond Kadesh-Barnea without special permission from the gods Utu-Shamash or Nannar-Sin.  Kadesh-Barnea was the furthest place Shulgi reached when he militarily campaigned in Canaan.  The iconic Gilgamesh also sought the green light to proceed into Tilmun at Kadesh-Barnea.


From Kadesh-Barnea, there was only one other place to touch before Tilmun. This was El-Paran, meaning “God’s Gloried Place”. Also known as Nakhl, El-Paran was the official retreat of Nannar-Sin and his wife Ningal (from whom the name Nakhl derived). It was an isolated and highly fortified oasis in the great, desolate plain that was the Sinai Peninsula. It was at El-Paran that Sin and Ningal eventually retired post-2024 BC, after the upheavaling of Sodom and Gomorrah.


It was at Kadesh-Barnea that Abraham ensconced himself with his troops, practically ring-fencing the spaceport from possible seizure by Nabu’s forces.  It was whilst Abraham was at Kadesh-Barnea that two things happened. First, Amar-sin was crowned as the new King of Sumer-Akkad, succeeding his father Shulgi, who had died in a death engineered by Enlil the previous year (2048 BC). In Genesis, Amar-Sin is referred to as “Amraphel King of Shinar,” Shinar being the Hebrew name for Sumer.  As can easily be gleaned from his theophoric name, Amar-Sin (meaning “Adorer of Sin”) was a protégé of the god Nannar-Sin. Second, Abraham received new instructions from Enlil. He was to advance on northern Egypt, sever it from the rest of Egypt, and append it to Canaan.

GENERAL ABE SETS FOR EGYPT

Regarding Abraham’s foray into Egypt, the Bible does own up on the event. It does state unequivocally that from the Negev Desert Abraham did head for Egypt.  The  story is related from GENESIS 12:10-13:2. The passage says Abraham left the Negev for Egypt to seek grain there as there was famine in Canaan. Josephus echoes it very closely in the following words:


“Now, after this, when a famine had invaded the land of Canaan, and Abram had discovered that the Egyptians were in a flourishing condition, he was disposed to go down to them, both to partake of the plenty they enjoyed, and to become an auditor of their priests, and to know what they said concerning the gods; designing either to follow them, if they had better notions than he, or to convert them into a better way, if his own notions proved the truest.”


What emerges as curious is that  when Abraham gets to Egypt, he’s received not by agricultural traders but by a Pharaoh. Even more curious, when Abraham returns from Egypt, he is not accompanied by wagons of grain or any other agricultural produce. Instead, what we’re told is that he emerges from Egypt as a filthy rich man – “heavily stocked with cattle, with silver and with gold”.  


Clearly, there’s more than meets the eye, which the Genesis writers deliberately left out. They do not even state how long Abraham stayed in Egypt because had they done so, the readers would have become curious as to why a person who left in an emergency situation (in the midst of famine and the vital safeguarding of the all-important spaceport)  should have taken so long in a foreign country.


It is only when we turn to the Egyptian records and read intimations  in the Sumerian chronicles that we get the  true circumstances of Abraham’s journey to Egypt.  The insights we thus again are that the Genesis story took place when Abraham travelled from northern Egypt (ironically called Lower Egypt in Egyptian chronicles) to  southern Egypt (equally referred to as Upper Egypt in Egyptian chronicles). At the time, Abraham was no longer a Canaan-based military general: in what turns out to be one of the Bible’s best-kept secrets, Abraham  was a Pharaoh of a part of Egypt.

NEXT WEEK: ABRAHAM’S FORAY INTO EGYPT

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