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Home » Columns » Ninurta Routs Marduk

Ninurta Routs Marduk

Publishing Date : 10 July, 2017

Benson C Saili
THIS EARTH, MY BROTHER                                                     

 

“Son of God” wages chemical warfare in showdown between Enkites and Enlilites
 

The Second Pyramid War, pitying Enlilites, led by Ninurta, against Enkites, led by Marduk, “The Great Serpent”, was bloodier than the First Pyramid War, in which Seth squared up against Horus. For the first time ever, the Anunnaki employed a combination of conventional and chemical weapons, the latter of which wielded by the more callous Enlilites, the faction headed by the Bible’s main Jehovah. And as usual in wars like these where elephants tangle, it was the grass – poor Earthlings – that bore the harsher brunt. It were the foot soldiers and the totally uninvolved civilian masses who were the overwhelming victims of the carnage. 
 

Ninurta’s onslaught on the Sinai Peninsula was so vicious and so ferocious the hugely outgunned Enkites hastily withdrew to their legal domain, the continent of Africa. When it came to pounding the enemy in high altitude, mountainous terrain, General Ninurta, the Master Blaster, was ruthless and highly effective: he wasn’t called “The God of War” simply for the fun of it. “I am the Lord of the High Mountains (El Shaddai in the Old Testament),” he would later boast. “Of the mountains which to the horizon raise their peak, I am the master.”


Retreating from the Sinai Peninsula, the Enkites perhaps pinned their hopes on much familiar ground in their African ramparts. If so, they had a rude awakening. The Enlilite attack forces were spearheaded by Ninurta and Ishkur-Adad. While Ninurta, the “Whirlwind”, led and sustained the frontal attack, Adad, the “Storm Wind”,  zeroed in on the countryside behind enemy lines, destroying and disrupting both food sources and supplies.


“In the Abzu (Africa), Adad caused the fish to waste away, the cattle to be dispersed,” the Sumerian records relate. The aim was to starve the enemy combatants and thus sap their energies, thereby enervating and demoralising them into surrender if they wanted to avoid total annihilation.    The Enlilites shelled, bombed, and gassed without let-up.


Although Nergal of the Enkites had opted to tread a neutral path by staying out of the war, that did not insulate him from the Enlilite wrath. Ninurta ordered a pre-emptive, thorough and decisive offensive on Nergal’s cult city Meslam as it was deemed to be potentially the strongest militarily. In doing so, Ninurta reasoned that Nergal’s non-involvement in the hostilities was in all probability a ruse: it was calculated to lure the Enlilites into a false sense of triumphalism, whereupon Nergal would spring upon them and totally obliterate their ranks.


Nergal took the assault on his city as a provocation and consequently threw down the gauntlet to join the war. By the time he did, however, a great deal of damage had been done. “The Enlilite scorched the Earth and made the rivers run red with blood of the innocent bystanders – the men, women, and children of the Abzu,” writes Zechariah Sitchin in The War of the Gods.    


But Nergal was far from cowed. From his theatre of war, he gave the Enlilites as much as he took, which spread alarm in their midst. Fearing that the tables could so spectacularly turn, Ninurta, the firstborn “Son of God”, gave orders for chemical weapons to be unleashed on every inch of Nergal’s territory. These poison-bearing missiles had the effect that Nergal’s heartland was laid to waste in terms of the toll of human and animal lives.


The chemical warfare waged by the Enlilites is described in vivid imagery in the Sumerian chronicles. The particular weapon that strafed Nergal’s lands with billows of poisonous gas is called “The Weapon Which Tears Apart”. This weapon “robbed the senses” (caused people to turn mad) and “peeled the skin off”. The result was that “the canals were filled with blood for days, for dogs like milk to lick.”


Ninurta, the Bible’s “Archangel Michael”,  was merciless and relentless: when droves upon droves of civilian Africans took to the mountains to escape the chemical blitz, he followed after them using what sounds like napalm bombs. “With the Weapon That Smites, he threw fire upon the mountains,” say the Sumerian records.  This utter disregard for civilian wellbeing was so unconscionable Ningishzidda, who like Nergal had initially chosen not to be part and parcel of the hostilities, decided it was time he too reinforced his fighting brood.

 

ENKITES FORTIFY THEMSELVES IN PYRAMID

 

Since the Enkites were clearly on the ropes, their general Marduk finally buckled, having lost great numbers of both the foot soldiers and the civilian populace. At the urging of Enki, he ordered a unilateral ceasefire but without an outright surrender. Marduk was not a spent force yet: he was simply counting on one furious, rearguard knockout salvo from the impregnability of the “House Which Is Raised Like A Heap” – the Great Pyramid – into which all the Enkites had retreated. 


But Ninurta, the Anunnaki’s “Foremost of Warrior” as was one of his acclamations, was not yet done. His aim was to capture or kill the Great Serpent. Thus he now trained his missiles on the Great Pyramid with a view to rattle the Enkites and get them to capitulate. Well, he had not counted on the genius of Enki. The “Wise Craftsman” took Nergal and Ningishzidda aside and administered to them marathon electromagnetic tips on how to secure the pyramid.


Applying these tips, Ningishzidda raised a protective electromagnetic shield around the pyramid which no firepower could penetrate, let alone what were called “Death Rays”, that is,  a kind of electronic weapon that beamed deadly radiation rays. At the same time, Nergal further fortified the pyramid’s defence system by strengthening the ray-emitting crystals known as the Water Stone and the Apex Stone.  What that entailed was that the Enkites were now untouchable: there was nothing Ninurta could do to get at them, finish and klaar.


Ninurta, however, was hardly at his wits ends. He was by no means outsmarted by the Enkites. Unable to inflict martial harm on the Enkites anymore, he detailed his nephew Utu-Shamash to cut off the water supply to the pyramid and to mount a hawk-eyed vigil over the pyramid precincts day and night so that anybody leaving or entering it would be taken out in a hail of military fire. This new weapon Ninurta resorted too was famishment.


The Enkites were to be made to wither from hunger and thirst. It took months though for Ninurta’s measures to begin to bite as the pyramid was substantially catered to. It was to all intents and purposes self-contained but not indefinitely so.
 

When the hunger and thirst began to gnaw away at the men in the Ekur, the Enkites decided that Horus, the youngest of the Enkite pantheon, should steal out at the head of a small party to look for rations. In the dead of night, when the Enlilites were expected to have let their guard down a bit, Horus and a few men accordingly sneaked out of the pyramid, he himself disguised as a ram, the emblem of Marduk. 


But Shamash was no simpleton: he was quick to read through the Horus hoax   and when the young god and his men had gotten to just beyond the range of the electromagnetic fence, Ninurta gave orders to “blast him with fire”. This was not literal fire but a kind of precision laser beam unleashed from Ninurta’s “Brilliant Weapon”.   As such, Horus was not blown to smithereens but simply lost an eye.

 
The moment Horus was so injured, the men around him radioed Enki inside the pyramid. Enki in turn radioed a neutral Ninmah, the Anunnaki’s Chief Medical Officer, to rush over and attend to the young god’s injuries before they aggravated. Ninurta was deeply opposed to the idea of his highly cherished mother “entering alone in Enemyland” but Ninmah was adamant that she just had to proceed and save the young Enkite’s life.


Ninurta at last caved in but not before he provided her with “clothes which should make her unafraid”, which was simply anti-radiation apparel. Ninurta immediately ordered a suspension of hostilities so as not to unduly put his mother in harm’s way.

 

NINMAH INITIATES PEACE FEELER

 

Arriving at the Giza Pyramid with a team of medics, Ninmah’s intention was not simply to attend to the injuries of Horus: she wanted to broker a truce between the Enkites and Enlilites lest the war escalate to a kind of Armageddon. So as her medical team dealt with Horus right on the steps of the pyramid, she radioed Enki and began to sound out peace feelers. In particular, she suggested that Enki meet Enlil face-to-face at the Harsag, her abode at Tilmun, and set about hammering out terms for the peace.


But before that, the Enkites had to surrender   control of the Giza Pyramid to a neutral arbiter, herself. After all, her honorary Egyptian title was Hathor, meaning Mistress of the Great Pyramid. It was time now that the title became literal and official, at least throughout the duration of the peace process.
 

Having consulted his sons, Enki gave the proposition the nod, which was in keeping with his pacifist bent naturally “That which is like a heap (the Giza Pyramid), that which I have as a pile raised up, its Mistress you may be,” Enki said to Ninmah. But, Enki insisted, that was only subject to the Enlilites agreeing to round-table deliberations on a mutually beneficial way forward.


Ninmah, who took with him Horus and put him in a medical clinic at the Harsag, flew to the Mission Control Centre at Jerusalem, where Enlil was now based, and reported what transpired during her exchanges with Enki. Enlil was with Adad when she met him. Adad was not keen on the idea of sit-down talks with the Enkites: he wanted an unconditional surrender. “We are expecting victory,” he bragged to Ninmah.


“The enemy forces are beaten.” The only thing Ninmah had to do was to fetch Marduk and bring him over so that he enunciates   his surrender before Ninurta. Only then would the ceasefire hold and discussions take place. “Go talk to the enemy (Marduk),” Adad hollered. “Get him to attend the discussions so that the attack can be withdrawn.”


Although Enlil endorsed Adad’s position, it was Enki, rather than Marduk, he would rather meet. It seemed Enlil too no longer favoured continued hostilities as he spoke in a uncharacteristically conciliatory tone. He put it to Adad that Ninmah, who he referred to as the Mother of the Gods, was acting at the say-so of King Anu on Nibiru and not on her own behalf. She therefore had to be heeded. Then turning to Ninmah, Enlil said: “Go appease my brother (Enki). Raise with him a hand for life. From his barred doorway let him come out.”


Rushing back to the Giza Pyramid in a chopper, Ninmah accordingly relayed the message from Enlil to Enki at the door of the great structure. Initially, Enki was reluctant to emerge for fear that he was being lured into a death trap, but Ninmah swore “by the stars” that his safety was guaranteed. At long last, Enki and his brood  trooped out of the Giza Pyramid and got aboard the chopper, whereupon they set course for the Harsag, where Enlil awaited them. At the controls of an escort helicopter gunship right in their wake was General Ninurta.

 

                                                                       A PEACE TREATY IS REACHED        

 

At the Harsag, the two clans sat opposite each other, with Ninmah as chairlady and moderator at the head table. On the Enlilite side were Enlil, Ninurta, Nannar-Sin, and Adad. The Enkites were represented by Enki, Marduk, and Nergal. The rest of the clan members sat in the outer hall, eagerly waiting for Ninmah to come and announce the outcome of the deliberations. 


At the commencement of the proceedings, the Enlilites were not that favourably disposed towards Ninmah. At least two of them were not convinced she was a neutral arbiter. Nannar-Sin kept referring to her as Tsir, meaning snake, a metaphor for the Enkites, who paternally traced their origins to the Serpent Race of Orion, to which Enki, who was the firstborn son of the Orion Queen and was born asexually without male involvement, belonged.
 

Adad panned her as a sympathiser with the “demons”, his characterisation of the Enkites. Ninmah had to perform a symbolic neutral-ground ceremony and chant an oracle of total impartiality to demonstrate her merit as a wholly objective peace broker.”Find peace,” she entreated the two belligerents. “We descendents of Anu all must of warring cease.”


The first to speak was Enki. Enki made no pretences at vanity or bravado. With cap in hand, he appealed to his step-brother Enlil reverentially thus: “O one who is foremost among the brothers, Bull of Heaven, who the fate of mankind holds: in my lands (Africa) all the dwellings are filled with sorrow by your attacks.”
 

Enlil, as heartless as he otherwise was, was seemingly moved by Enki’s lament. Rising to his feet magisterially, he announced: “Removed is the affliction (visited upon Africans by Ninurta in the war) from the face of the Earth. The Great Weapon (Ninurta’s untouchable Imdugud) is lifted.” But for the peace to effect, Enlil demanded two courses of action by the Enkites. First, the Canaanites should dis-inhabit Jerusalem, the site of the Mission Control Centre, and the Sinai Peninsula, the site of the spaceport.


This in fact was a concession by Enlil as Ninurta wanted a total withdrawal from the entire lands of Shem. Ninmah, however, neutralised him, persuasively arguing that ejecting the Canaanites wholesale from the lands of Shem would only be possible if they were carpet-bombed as having dwelt in the region for more than 300 years, they would rather they were forcibly uprooted than leave voluntarily.   Secondly, all the Igigis who had taken part in the capture of Tilmun and Mission Control Centre by Seth should be expelled from Lebanon.  
 

Enki readily gave ground. “I will grant thee (the Enlilites) the rulers’ position in the Restricted Zone (the Sinai Peninsula),” he said to Enlil. “The Radiant Place (Jerusalem) I will entrust.” However, Enki insisted that his concession was subject to Enlil undertaking that the Giza Pyramid would forever be under Enkite authority. But the chess match was not yet over. Enlil said that was well and good, but one strong conditionality had to be met.


This was that the Enlilites must be given the right to recommend the ruler over Giza as well as lower (northern) Egypt. Enki duly agreed, whereupon the Enlilites voted for Ningishzidda as the new ruler of northern Egypt and new authority over Giza. Zidda was particularly acceptable to the Enkites because he was the son of Ereshkigal, Enlil’s granddaughter and Sin’s daughter. That’s how Zidda replaced Horus as the King of Egypt circa 8670 BC. Zidda was to rule Egypt for 1570 years in a reign that saw the most peaceful and harmonious relations between the Enkites and Enlilites.    
 

The final prerequisite for peace was tabled by Enki. He demanded Enlil’s undertaking that the Enkites should be free to visit the Edin, which was to be re-established. Enki also demanded the same sovereignty he had over his prediluvial cult city Eridu, the first Anunnaki settlement on Earth which he founded. Ninurta strongly objected to the idea of Enki regaining Eridu, saying it now would be in strictly Enlilite territory, but Ninmah prevailed over him for the sake of peace and Enki’s potential usefulness as the new Edin’s engenderer of prosperity.
 

On his part, Enlil endorsed his half-sister’s standpoint and said thus to Enki: “In my land (the new Edin) let your abode (Eridu) become everlasting. From the day that you shall come into my presence, the laden table shall exhale delicious smells for thee ... Pour abundance onto the land; each year increase its fortunes.” Ninmah also said to Enki: “Lord of Life, God of Fruit, let the beer (wine) pour in double measure. Make abundant the wool.”

NEXT WEEK:  THE NINURTA  SHOCKER!

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